On Eyam Moor and the hunt for Stone Circles

I had the opportunity a couple of weekends ago to go up to Eyam Moor looking for stone circles.  Its quite a place, and very much a quieter part of the Peak than Higger Tor, Owler Tor and Padley that it looks across to some 2 – 3 km away.

I was there primarily to visit Wet Withens (Eyam Moor I) – a large-ish stone circle that doesn’t actually have any paths to it.  But first I had to try and find Eyam Moor III, which was meant to be near the “entrance” to the moor.  However after an age in the area that my guide book suggested, no luck, I gave up to look for Eyam Moor II, which again my book got wrong.  However on this occasion I did find it – the large cairn with the trench cut through the middle gives it away 🙂  Afterwards I discovered that the book had the wrong grid reference for Eyam Moor III and I had probably walked straight over it on the way to Eyam Moor II (doh!)

Tree near Eyam Moor II

 

Tree near Eyam Moor II

 

The peace of the place was just what I needed after the usual hectic Christmas and New Year, I think I saw at a distance another 3 walkers, but they were sticking firmly to the paths.

After I good hour just lying in the heather and listening to the grouse I made tracks to get to Wet Withens (Eyam Moor I).  There is no path to Wet Withens, you have to make your own way across what if the heather wasn’t so high must be quite a vast burial complex of cairns.  Wet Withens is quite a large stone circle (in Derbyshire terms) though the size of the stones no higher than what you’d find elsewhere (2 – 3 feet).

Wet Withens Stone Circle, Eyam Moor

 

Wet Withens Stone Circle, Eyam Moor

The stone, pictured above, is said to resemble Higger Tor (which it aligns with as well), behind which the sunrises at mid summer.  Definitely one to add to my hit list of locations to take pictures of!  Next to the stone circle is a very large barrow that has been robbed in places, but its still worth a scramble around.

If Stanton Moor is too busy for you, and you still want your fill of stone circles, then I would thoroughly recommend a trip to Eyam Moor.

You can find more of my megalithic photography here and more information about the area here.

 

 

 

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